Meet a Math Teacher Who Is Also a Male Model

A PhD in engineering that loves to train his body. He teaches math and in math, theories are disapproved with counterexamples. So I think it’s safe to say that he is the counterexample to the myth that an exercised body means less intelligence!

TIME

What would you do if you realized your math teacher was actually a super successful – and super attractive – male model? Because that’s exactly what happened to University College London student Arief Azli, who (like any college kid) then shared his discovery on Facebook.

“That moment when you realized your maths lecturer is one of the top designer model,” Azli wrote in a post comparing two photos of his teacher, Pietro Boselli: One of Boselli at the whiteboard, papers in the hand; the other of him … not wearing very much at all.

[newsletter-the-brief]

“#OnlyatUCL,” Azli hashtagged it, adding: “#Bromance.”

Other students reportedly followed suit, sharing more photos of Boselli in the classroom.

According to his LinkedIn account, Boselli worked as a teaching assistant and then lecturer at UCL until June 2014. As for his modeling work, he’s represented by Models1.

His Instagram says he has a…

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The True Story of The Imitation Game

I hadn’t the opportunity to see this film yet. But it seems quite interesting. When it arrives to the cinema I will see it… Meanwhile, here is an article unfolding the truth behind the film. 🙂

Trailer:

Big Think interview about Alan Turing:

TIME

Though The Imitation Game was largely based on the biography Alan Turing: The Enigma, much of Alan Turing’s life is shrouded in mystery. Turing, played by Benedict Cumberbatch in the film, is credited as the father of computer science. He cracked codes produced by the German military’s seemingly unbreakable Enigma machine during World War II using math, engineering and still-to-be-invented computer science. But most of the documents tracing his work for the British government have been destroyed and little is known about Turing’s personal life.

Here’s what is likely truth and what is embellishment in The Imitation Game based on Alan Turing: The Enigma and the Turing Exhibition at London’s Science Museum.

Alan Turing’s first love, Christopher, died at a young age

Ruling: Fact

Christopher, an older student at Sherborne School in Dorset, was also interested in math. Turing harbored feelings toward Christopher, though Turing believed his love was…

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Celebrate Philae’s Comet Landing With These 3 Mesmerizing Music Videos

Beautiful videos to celebrate Philae probe landing on comet. Please follow this link to know more about it… http://reut.rs/14dRwM2 🙂

TIME

To celebrate the successful touchdown Wednesday of its Philae lander on Comet 67P, the European Space Agency released these three music videos inspired by the decade-long mission and scored by Greek composer Vangelis. The videos show an entrancing artist’s rendition of Comet 67P “dancing” in space, as well as an animation of Philae’s journey to the comet on the Rosetta spacecraft.

Philae will remain on the comet’s surface as it approaches the sun and will relay data back to Rosetta as it continues to orbit 67P. The mission is expected to end in December 2015.

“Philae’s Journey”

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“Arrival”

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A Glimpse of the sun’s power II: How the rainbows are formed?

Added content regarding the origins of the acronym Roy G. Biv! 🙂

Gleams of Knowledge

You found out how the auroras are formed. Now you will learn about rainbows.

Rainbows are not formed in the practical meaning of existence, i.e. they are not real. They belong to what we usually call optical illusions. Rainbows are caused by the reflection and refraction of light in water droplets. After this the light scatters into different colors because different colours have different wavelengths. This means that they will leave the water droplet at different angles hence making a “colour palette” (ROG. BIV). [1]

What is even more interesting is that the rainbows are full circles… Want to know more? Watch this two videos of SciShow!

&

As always I hope you learnt something new! 🙂 [2]


Extra:

Minutephysics has just made a wonderful video explaining the origins of the acronym ROG. BIV. Watch it!

I’m…

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You Asked: Is Cracking Your Knuckles Bad?

Is cracking your knuckles bad? Now you know 🙂

TIME

From fingers and toes to necks and knees, everyone knows a “cracker.” And most habitual joint poppers have heard rumors their habit may cause arthritis. But are those rumors true?

First, a quick anatomy lesson: Many of your joints—including those that allow your fingers to beckon or point—feature small pockets or gaps that are filled with synovial fluid. Like axle grease, this fluid allows the bones that commingle in your joints to glide close to one another without grating, explains Dr. Pedro Beredjiklian, chief of hand and wrist surgery at Philadelphia’s Rothman Institute.

When you pull, twist or otherwise “crack” a joint, you’re expanding the volume of space between your bones, Beredjiklian says. That volume expansion creates negative pressure, which sucks the synovial fluid into the newly created space. This sudden inflow of fluid is the popping you feel and hear when you crack a knuckle, he adds.

The more…

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The Price of Staying Alive For the Next 3 Hours

The Price of Staying Alive For the Next 3 Hours” hold my attention because it’s a well written article with essential information regarding health care!

TIME

How much do you reckon you’d pay not to be dead three hours from now? That probably depends. If you’re 25 and healthy, a whole lot. If you’re 95 and sickly, maybe not so much. But for people in one part of the world—the former East Germany—the cost has been figured out, and it’s surprisingly cheap: three hours of life will set you back (or your government, really) just one euro, or a little below a buck-thirty at current exchange rates.

That’s the conclusion of a new study out of Germany’s Max Planck Institute, and it says a lot about the power of a little bit of money now to save a lot of suffering later—with implications for all manner of public health challenges, including the current Ebola crisis.

The new findings are a result of one of the greatest, real-time longitudinal studies ever conducted, one that began the moment…

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In Photos: 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Malala Yousafzai

The education activist who became the youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner after being shot in the head by Taliban! This young woman fights for human rights and equal opportunities. Her main focus is education and women’s equality . By the way… I didn’t know her (and for that I’m utterly embarrassed) from this day on I’m her fan and I will support her to provide a world full of justice!

The education activist who became the youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner after being shot in the head by Taliban! This young woman fights for human rights and equal opportunities. Her main focus is education and women’s equality . By the way… I didn’t know her (and for that I’m utterly embarrassed) from this day on I’m her fan and I […]

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Watch the Massive Hong Kong Protests From the Sky

Impressive!

TIME

Thousands of demonstrators are occupying key districts across Hong Kong in a massive democracy protest that has drawn international attention. Following a night of clashes with police, the number of protesters appeared to grow substantially on Monday.

The video above, posted Monday on the Facebook account of Nero Chan, helps convey the scope of the ongoing protests.

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7 things learned from a day spent watching TEDxCERN

Learn something with the TEDxCERN!

TED Blog

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Wednesday marked the second-ever TEDxCERN, the event organized by the folks at CERN, the famed particle physics research center in Geneva, Switzerland, responsible for bringing us the World Wide Web, the Large Hadron Collider, and confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson. You know, just a few minor things.

TEDxCERN brought together a mix of experts from across the sciences and the world, people all working to answer the question: “What are the big ideas in science that will help us address tomorrow’s major global problems?” Particle physicist (and three-time TED speaker) Brian Cox served as quippy host, while more than a thousand attendees watched live in CERN’s Globe of Science and Innovation.

If you weren’t one of the lucky thousand, or were too swamped with work to catch the live webcast, don’t despair. We watched for you. And created a list of things we…

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